• Ancillary building 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1984)
      At a short distance from the chapel are the bunker-like facilities for pilgrims and housing for clerics, alleviated only by the grass roof and colored abstractions.
    • A close up of "gargoyle" and catchment 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1984)
    • The color of the stained glass in the south wall 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1984)
    • The color of the stained glass in the south wall 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1984)
      The stained glass of the playfully indented windows are photographed to achieve the proper perception of color.
    • The door from the interior 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1984)
      Le Corbusier often averred that "an architecture must be walked through and traversed…" Nowhere is this more true than in Ronchamp. One can wander from place to place either outside or inside this incredible building and ...
    • East wall with Virgin and votive candles 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1984)
      From this angle along the south wall, the disruptive floor to ceiling windows disappear and the sacral display of votive candles lead the eye upward to the small window with an image of the Virgin.
    • Entrance door 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1984)
      Flanked by the two smaller towers and mounted on a central pivot, the brilliantly enameled door by Le Corbusier hints at the enchantment of the interior.
    • Entry door to Notre Dame de Haut 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1969)
      Designed by Le Corbusier.
    • Exterior liturgical facility 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1984)
      Since the pilgrimage church will sometimes minister to groups composed of thousands, there is an outdoor pulpit and altar/table for the celebration of the mass. The human scale of pulpit and table is complimented by the ...
    • Fenestration 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1969)
      Le Corbusier deep set his windows with bits of colored glass and iconography giving a sense both of mystery, playfulness, and joy, all of which may be considered appropriate to worship.
    • The interior of Notre Dame du Haut 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1984)
      In the foreground, one senses the uneven stone work of a sloping floor. To the side are pews which will seat fifty of the rooms capacity of two hundred. In front are the communion rails, on the slightly raised platform of ...
    • Liturgical center 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1969)
      The liturgical center is marked by the altar/table barely raised above floor level on the right with a pulpit hanging from the wall on the left. The curved structure behind it leads to a door to the outdoor pulpit for mass ...
    • North wall and pulpit 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1984)
      Different angles produce new aspects of awareness where here we see the cantilevered stairs to the pulpit and the later addition of a rope/railing for the safety of the priest.
    • Notre Dame du Haut by Le Corbusier 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1969)
      Lord and Mother: Under this sectional rubric for the Middle Ages we visited Corbusier's distinctive pilgrimage church dedicated to the Virgin.
    • Notre Dame du Haut, 1953-1955 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1984)
      Le Corbusier, architect. Built atop a hill and replacing a traditional church destroyed in World War II, Le Corbusier, known for architecture replete with straight lines and right angles, created this pilgrimage church ...
    • Outdoor liturgical center 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1984)
      Seen from this angle, beyond the altar/table and to the right, one can ascend the steps to the lectern/pulpit. Projecting from the wall is the dominant pulpit for great pilgrimages.
    • The playfully indented south wall 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1984)
      The depth of the thickness at the base of the wall is 12.1 from which it tapers to 4.7 feet. Spatially, my wife Erma, standing within the indent gives perhaps a more vivid sense of spatial relationships.
    • Pulpit and access to exterior pulpit 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1984)
      To the left of the east wall and interior altar/table, is a small balcony providing access to the outdoor pulpit. On the interior north wall (left) is the pulpit for the chapel interior. Again note the floating ceiling ...
    • Relationship of entry to the magical south wall 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1984)
      Just inside the door is a tapered cylinder for holy water, the intention of which is to always remind one of one's baptism. To the left are the portals for the deeply recessed windows.
    • Side chapel 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1984)
      Alongside the entrance at the base of one of the flanking towers is an altar for the side chapel. Its stark simplicity with the light from the clerestories and candle and stuccoed cylindrical walls lend an aura of sanctity ...