• Ariadne 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1971)
      Close up of sarcophagi frontal of Ariadne being covered with gift of eternal sleep.
    • Cetus 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1971)
      The sea monster was a very familiar figure in Roman iconography known as a cetus. One finds him repeatedly in Roman iconography and Christians used it despite its narrow throat to depict the monster who swallows Jonah. A ...
    • Endymion 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1971)
      Endymion being covered with the gift of eternal sleep by the cherubim. Whenever we see either of them in their eternal repose, they have their right arms cocked behind their heads.
    • The goddess Hera/Juno 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1971)
      Statue of the goddess Juno in the Sala Rotonda, Vatican Museum. Christianity entered a world with an iconography filled with gods and goddesses, with these deities having varied roles from one another and one place to ...
    • Pagan sarcophagi with Ariadne 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1971)
      In the figure of Jonah reclining under the cucurbitas another conventional figure was used, the mythological figure of Ariadne. Pagan sarcophagi, lower center right depicts Ariadne. Gallery des Candelabra, Museo Pio ...
    • Roman Senator 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1971)
      For the Roman citizen to burn incense before the emperor was as honorable an act as to pledge allegiance to the flag. Roman Senator about to offer a sacrifice, the Vatican Museum, Salle du Bige.
    • Sarcophagus of Santa Constanza 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 19)
      Porphyry sarcophagus of Santa Constanza, daughter of emperor Constantine.
    • Statue of Aphrodite 

      Bruggink, Donald J. (Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Michigan), 1971)
      Aphrodite, like so many of the Greek gods and goddesses was in the early days of Christianity respected more as a symbol of beauty and femininity than as an object of worship. Statue of Aphrodite, Vatican Museum.